Main

Books Archives

Monsieur Ambivalence

Pascal and Fuller - what a combination and (Ms) Stendhal once again puts her keen eye and vibrant pen to full force. She could sell me anything. P.S. to Scene4: You sold me (Ms) Stendhal why don't you sell the book too?

Judy Moritz

read Renate Stendhal's article

Monsieur Ambivalence

A rare treat, Judy Moritz, to read your comment. I thank you for making me laugh as I am the type of writer who would rather do anything than be selling anything! But as you so kindly suggest, I'll give it a try. How about a peek at my brand-new Scene4 Archive? 10 years of blissful and sometimes hilarious collaboration with the excellent Arthur Meiselman. All now in neat categories, with dates and easy one-click access... You'll find it at the bottom of my March article, Monsieur Ambivalence. There, I've done it. Are you buying it?

Renate Stendhal

read Renate Stendhal's review

Monsieur Bivalence

I buy it. Nicely done. What a body of work. 10 years you say? More like a lifetime. I hope you'll keep adding to it for another 10 years. Now for that book that Scene4 should publish and you should sell. I'll buy it.

Judy Moritz

see Renate Stendhal's archive

Renate Stendhal/Monsieur Ambivalence

Every writer needs at least one intelligent reader, and as the publisher of 'Monsieur Ambivalence' by Thomas Fuller, I was overjoyed how thoroughly you 'got' the book, a book that requires some pretty special equipment to get. I'm trying to reach Tom Fuller, a recluse, with the news...I'm sure he'll be extremely pleased.

Brooks Roddan

read Renate Stendhal's article

Riding Shotgun With Courtney Joyner

Excellent article, filled with interesting stuff I knew nothing about, the best kind. I have to read this book now. It reminds me of the movie with Yul Brynner in 1973 called Westworld. Brynner was a robot and it is the only western I've ever liked that had anything "Supernatural" about it. But Yul Brynner was an icon. I don't think anyone else could have pulled it off.

Kenneth Sibbett

read Les Marcott's column

How Now Copyright?

I read, with interest, Arthur Meiselman's piece on copyright. My response to the writer, since I am cited by him as a spur to his article is this:

I am not against copyright, that is, not against having some form of protection for created work, for the "property" of the creator.  I would just dial back the protections to the original terms of the Copyright Act of 1790, which gave a creator 14 years of protection, with an additional term of 14 years if he or she was alive at the time of the renewal.  (The original law only protected books, maps, and charts; other items, like music and paintings, were added later.)

I also don't have a problem with copyrights being treated as commodities and passed along/sold to other parties, as long as the time limits don't reset during the exchange: If my father in his will passes along to me the copyright to his wildly successful book, and thus its profits, in the 27th year of its copyright (renewed after 14 years), I get the profits for one more year only, and that's it.  Then the book goes into the public domain.  (Whatever publishing rights companies have do not trump the copyright term limit -- once the property passed into the public domain, they no longer have exclusive access to it.)

I would also support a provision that doesn't make copyright automatic once a work is created.  Copyrights would have to registered, with a small fee to do this, in order to start the clock ticking on the first 14 years.  If a copyright is not registered, then that work does not have copyright protection and is automatically added to the public domain.  (We'd have to work out some window during which a creator can register so that the created work has a provisional or contingent protection, a "pre-copyright" protection, in case they're on walkabout in Australia when the inspiration comes.)  This would also allow people to forego copyright if they didn't want it (today known as "copyleft") without having to go through the hoops of the Creative Commons licensing procedures (but this would also mean that the creator would have no say in how the work gets used in the public domain).

The logistics of this are too complicated for this limited space, but they are mostly legalistic in nature once the umbrella concept of a time-limit for a registered copyright is established (e.g., can someone "own" something in the public domain, such as a Picasso painting hanging in the Metropolitan Museum, or "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" in its new Japanese manga version?).  This doesn't make them easy but it does make them doable and possible.

My desire is to get as much material, actual and virtual, into the public domain as possible as quickly as possible without too much interference from the dead hand of the past or the greed of corporations and creators -- as the original act said, in order "to encourage learning."  Twenty-eight years seems enough time for a creator to make his or her money.  My desire is to cut back all the kudzu that has smothered copyright to the point where, now, anything after 1923 is out of bounds, with absurd restrictions like a book not going into the public domain until 70 years after the death of its author.  To me, that's racketeering.

Of course I will not win this argument -- there is too much money at stake.  But it's an argument that still needs to be made.

Michael Bettencourt


I agree with most of Michael Bettencourt's arguments. But the implication of his strong desire toward "public domain" is what concerns me. I don't care about the financial provisos of copyright: protect the creator and the creator's heirs, all for a reasonable time, and then the hell with it... let the bucks be made by the buck-makers. What I do care about is the content, the creation as the creator conceived it. Within most current copyright protection, while the creator is alive, his/her permission is required to change one comma, one note, one choreographic movement, one anything. Once the creator has been de-created, my admonition is that the permission is no longer available. Nothing should be changed. If a creation is to be adapted, write a new version based on the original, but do not, do not use the original words or notes or strokes. If you want to do "Rome&Juliet" Mr. Luhrman (after you find actors who can speak English), write your own. I cite George Bernard Shaw who sent a sheriff with a cease&desist court order at the Broadway opening of one of his plays: do it the way he wrote it or don't do it. If you want to do a Balanchine ballet, do it as he conceived it, or choreograph your own. The argument against my argument is: hey, that's not the way show business works. My answer: Tough shite! Shaw understood the business of show better than almost anyone alive today. Of course, he's dead and his creations? Unprotected.

As I calm down here, I'm fully aware that it is the Internet which has unleashed an irrevocable shattering of copyright protection. The "mashup" is the worse thing that has happened to artistic creation since the invention of television and free agency in baseball. And, as Rebecca Solnit noted in Harper's: The Internet will also "create elaborate justifications for never paying artists or writers." She also notes: "...2014 has turned out quite a bit like [Orwell's] 1984."

Arthur Meiselman

Michael Bettencourt's earlier column: "Dear Mr. Beckett"

Arthur Meiselman's current column: "On Copyright And Cats"

Harriet Renaud

Very well written. The sense of foreboding, the change from cruelty to kindness, the surprising change in Ms Peskin, the house falling metaphor, all signs of accomplished craft.

Ormond Otvos

Harriet Halliday Renaud's Story: "Summer Day"

The Promise of Mont Saint Michel

A lovely, lovely story. Heart-rendering and at the same time uplifting. Ms Verdino-Süllwold's writing is deceptively simple at first and then embraces the reader and remains in the mind long after the story ends.

Leah Dupre Simmons

Carla Maria Verdino-Süllwold's story: "The Promise of Mont Saint Michel"

A Stein Acolyte Delivers a Cautionary Tale

This article is a masterful blend of deep knowledge of Gertrude Stein's work, a deeply-considered book review (Scene4 June 2016), and a fascinating author interview which is the result of savvy questions.  Alenier asks the questions we want to know the answers to, and also the questions we should have wanted to know the answers to.  There's so much here to ponder and continue pondering.  Out-of-the-box work, thanks!

Teri Rife

Karren LaLonde Alenier's column: "Stein Acolyte Delivers A Cautionary Tale "

Inbox Zero

Though both disturbing and thought-provoking, Mr. Bettencourt masterfully leads to a vexing question in his column this month (Scene4 June 2016): "What exactly does recollection do for us?" The answers to that question would fill an inbox to bursting.

Nelda Mandel-Rizick

Michael Bettencourt's column: "Inbox Zero"

Autumn

A simple story enhanced and heightened by the clarity of Mr. Bhatnagar's writing. The mystery that shrouds it is the writer's doing as a master puppeteer. I look forward to more of his work.

Tara-Ann Nguyen

Sandeep Girish Bhatnagar's story: Autumn

Gertrude and the Critics

Dear Ms Alenier, you are a blessed avatar for dear Gertrude. She would love you for all the attention and scholariness you pay to her. Keep it going, please.

Marcus Goldberg

Karren Alenier's column: Critics

About Books

This page contains an archive of all entries posted to RECENT LETTERS in the Books category. They are listed from oldest to newest.

Arts of Thailand is the previous category.

Country Western is the next category.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.

To SEND a LETTER to the EDITOR — Click Here
or
Send an email to letters@scene4.com