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Alenier Archives

Dr. Atomic

The article was helpful. I read it because I was trying to find out how long the opera lasted. "3 hours of dread" was the best I could come up with after 1/2 hour of googling.
John Phillips
read Karren Alenier's article

Beverly Sills

Thank you for this clean and compact capsule of the life of Beverly Sills. She brought love and humanity to a sometimes stilted art form. All you have to do is add her music to this article and you have an important profile of this champion and giant in American opera.
Alvin Roettner
read Karren Alenier's article

Cirque du Soleil - "O"

Nice review--makes one want to rush out and see it. Does anyone know how one can see this spectacle without making the pilgrimage to Vegasland and pay the exhorbitant ticket prices?
Will
read Karren Alenier's article

Cirque du Soleil -"O"

Fantastic review of Cirque Du Soleil's "O". I recently forked out the dough earlier this year to see this show and while it was well worth the price, your article captured the experience for those folks who either can't or won't make it to Vegas for this show.
Lia Beachy
read Karren Alenier's article

Steiny Road To Operadom

Karren Alenier takes us to another time, another era, another life, another appetite we did not know before. And let us have more.
Grace Cavalieri
read Karren Alenier's article

Happy Birthday, Gertrude Stein

I will be rereading this all week.SO rich, so much tapestry.One cannot get all it nourishes in one sitting. This is a fireside companion, this article.
Grace Cavalieri
read Karren Alenier's article

A Libretto Is Written

I think that it is generous to give the examples of the writing in progress rather than an abstract set of illusions. This is very satisfying it its detail.
Grace Cavalieri
read Karren Alenier's article

Gertrude Stein for President

It says it all. Thanks Karren.

Sandy Cohen

read Karren Alenier's article

Karren Alenier on Names

Very interesting on names. I am thinking about Stein called mother of DADA by the playwright (critiqued in this piece) and that this could be true in practice if not theory. She came in at the same time DADA was introduced in the US Armory Show 1913, and we associate Stein with such dismantling and remounting of ideas...so interesting subject.

Grace

read Karren Alenier's article

Dr. Atomic

Intelligent article. I gather that the reviewer preferred Sellars' opera to Woolcock's version although points were made in favor of each.

Grace

read Karren Alenier's review

Encompass Theater

Encompass Opera Company is a pioneer discovering new lands and so is Karren Alenier.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's article

Creative Financing Means Going On with the Show

Theater people of all genres, and for that matter all artists including endeavors involving poetry and the other written arts, must not be defeated by a government organization saying we cannot give you any money. Artists need to think outside of that sow's purse and actively seek money else where. If necessary, take off your hat (mine says "Poet" in big bold letters) and pass it around to those listening. If you cannot get past the embarrassment of begging, you are not a true artist. While we are on the subject, come see Four Saints in Three Acts Feb 20 at CUNY Graduate Center on 5th Avenue. It's free to the public. Look it up at EncompassOpera.org. Encompass doesn't yet have all the money needed for the 16 piece orchestra but if you come and toss something in the hat after you hear this wonderful performance of the most innovative American opera ever created, maybe Nancy Rhodes won't have to go to the Poor House.

Karren Alenier

Peter Grimes

How Marvelous! Had no knowledge of this work, and it is an enthralling discovery.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's column

Peter Grimes

I too fell in love with Peter Grimes a long time basically because I've always worshipped Britten's music and this opera is so incandescent. Thanks for a beautiful look at a beautiful production.

Amy Sachs

read Karren Alenier's article

Alenier's 'Seigfried'

I'm frankly not a Wagner fan except for Tristan, which an early beau played and played for me when I was 15. However, because I have a Polish-Canadian friend in Toronto who is a Wagner nut and edits a Wagner mag, I stolidly began to read-- liked what Karren said very much and read the whole thing! I will also forward him the site.

Elisavietta Ritchie

read Karren Alenier's review

Gertrude Stein's Miscreant - Otto Weininger

Very interesting reading, well-thought out.

Janice Olson

read Karren Alenier's column

Strange World of Gertrude Stein

You sure live in a strange and wonderful world. I still have an image of Gertrude Stein in front of my eyes from a long long time ago. I was a silent feminist before the word officially entered the lexicon. Your essay is excellent! Your conclusion is kind of scary.

Ilo-Mai Harding

read Karren Alenier's column

Weininger put to rest by Karren Alenier's excellent article

I much appreciate the way this well-researched and beautifully written article puts the disquieting spirit of Weininger and his possible influence on Gertrude Stein to rest. Being Jewish, a woman, and gay was a triple whammy of a handicap on someone who wanted to compete in the male-dominated arena of literature. Stein found a number of strategies to hide those unwanted identities and prevail. Being a "genius" was one; being an exile, an American in Paris was another; a third brilliant move was writing without disclosing her identity -- writing as "one" "anyone" "everyone" "someone" or "everybody". It took a genius to write her autobiography and call it "Everybody's Autobiography".

Renate Stendhal

read Karren Alenier's article

Opera in China

Thank you for your personal and informative portrait of the magnificent Beijing Opera. I have been there and seen it (and experienced it) a few times. It is grand opera at its grandest and great theatrical art and great entertainment. Your sense and perception added to my memories and enjoyment.

Anee S. Waterson

read Karren Alenier's article

Opera In China

This is a magnifcent overview. I cannot imagine anyone attending this opera without such an understanding as Karren gives us here.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's article

Karren Alenier's Pearl Buck

As someone, as a child, who loved reading Pearl Buck, the resonance of history shining in this article makes me glad to live long enough to see the distance covered.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's article

Revolution of Forms

Thank you so much for this look at new opera. Isn't wonderful how far-ranging opera is going. The Steiny Road to Operadom is now a super-highway. Thanks Karren Alenier for taking us with you on the journey.

Nuntaporn Amadsri

read Karren Alenier's column

On 'The Dresser' - Karren Alenier's Blog

From a comment posted to Karren Alenier's blog at Scene4...

I've been rereading a number of The Dresser's postings and I'm ashamed I haven't written before not only to thank you but to say how marvelous it is what you've been doing over this time. I have no reason to flatter -- you've brought such a fine critical intelligence and in a writing style that keeps one (me) moving from one sentence to another. Ann and I haven't gone to all that much in D.C. this year, so The Dressing has been a vicarious way of doing that. A bit of hyperbole maybe but not all that much. We did get to the Joe Louis opera -- I've seen numbers of Leon Major's productions, all of which have been strikingly distinctive. The voicies espeically of Carmon Balthrop and Adrienne Webster, as you say, were compelling -- Webster had terrific dramatic presence. I loved the staging -- the modern Greek chorus, the movement with chairs, the masks, the lighting, Kirby Malone and his partner's projections. The structure of the storytelling might have been more adventurous -- I felt my attention flag at times, which could easily have been me and not the libretto. I only read the Washington Post review later on, not wanting to be prejudiced, and the criticism had some validity, though in truth I was caught up in the production. I'm not a great fan of so-called biopics and so when I say it might have been more adventurous, something different than the linear storytelling. Then your observations about the Terra Cotta warriors, the differences between seeing them in Xian and at the National Geographic -- first rate. When I first read your post on Split This Rock, your comment about Holly Bass didn't register with me -- I didn't know her work and so it passed over. But on Friday night, a bunch of us were at the Enoch Pratt for a reading for Kim's Full Moon -- Holly read and did her "In This District," which I loved.

Merrill Leffler

read Karren Alenier's blog

Santa Fe Opera+ Karren Alenier

Well, It sounds as if this deserves a Pulitzer...I didn't know there was a Pulitzer category for opera. Apparently the dissonance was not too off-putting for this is a rave review.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's review

Karren Alenier on Ruhl

What a fine coverage of a play no one seemed to report accurately enough for my taste before.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's review

Paul Bowles

Thanks for the excellent research. Bowles was a beautiful writer but I do love his music. Your article is very well researched.

Shela Xoregos

read Karren Alenier's article

Nixon in China

Lovely, lovely, lovely. I am sorry I missed the theater broadcast. But it's almost like being there, reading your review. I wonder if the opening night audience left their politics home. And your comment- "a fishing trip, an opportunity to see what will be pulled out of the water or thin air?" They sure pulled a big and important one out of thin air,didn't they.

Melanie Mansmin

read Karren Alenier's review

Nixon in China

What's next-"Bush in Iraq"?

Sam D.

read Karren Alenier's review

End without an ending?

As an admirer of Gertrude Stein I feel I have to come to her aid by pointing out a few misunderstandings in my estimated colleague's interesting article. There is no indication anywhere that Stein didn't finish her murder mystery. The story ends very nicely, in fact, with a little "Thank you"-bow, an ironic finishing arabesque, and the word "Finis.", True, in his afterword to the 1982 reedition of the book, John Herbert Gill states, "'Blood on the Dining-Room Floor' comes to an end, but, as Gertrude Stein herself said of it, is has no ending." What that means, however, is, no ending in the traditional sense of what is expected in a murder mystery: the mystery solved, the murderer found. None of this, of course, in Stein's detective novel. The mystery of "Blood on the Dining-Room Floor" is that of Stein's identity. Who was she, now that she was suddenly famous? "I am I because my little dog knows me."  And here we come to  another   misunderstanding. I believe nobody and nothing ever "forced" Gertrude Stein into writing anything. She was not the kind. What she wanted at all cost was being famous, a "lion." If there were suggestions, from a publisher, for example, they were only stating the obvious: a compulsive author nearing age 60 would necessarily think of autobiographical writing. Doing it in the voice of her lover, as the pretend "Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas," is such a sly, playful move - even Stein couldn't have been that brilliant under any kind of pressure!

Renate Stendhal

read Karren Alenier's article  

Re: End without an ending?

Gertrude Stein would love that 65 years after her death, she can still stir people about her accomplishments. I respect what Renate Stendhal has to say about Stein's Blood on the Dining Room Floor and The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. Lots of scholars argue over what Stein meant and did. Diana Souhami in Gertrude and Alice, her biography of the famous pair wrote this: "Gertrude tried, but failed, to write about the strange events of the summer in a book called Blood on the Dining Room Floor. 'It was very bothersome. I thought I would try but to try is to die and so I did not really try. I was not doing any writing.'" Stein based Blood on the Dining Room Floor on some events local to her summer home in Bilignin. There was a dead woman but what happened was unclear as is whether Stein left Blood on the Dining Room Floor a cliffhanger or a neatly tied up literary package.
As for The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, there is no doubt that the writing of this work caused Stein incredible stress. Some people argue (not convincingly to my way of thinking however) that Alice Toklas wrote the work.

Karren Alenier

Glück's AVERNO

I am in love with Glück's AVERNO. What a treat to hear about its transformation.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's column

On Karren Alenier's Column

Three cheers for the math-music connection.
I look forward to more news of HOW MANY MIDNIGHTS!

JoAnne Growney

read Karren Alenier's "Steiny Road to Operadom"

Eeyore as Seer

Hey Kathi, I'll take the wisdom of Eeyore like "We can look for the North Pole, or we can play 'Here we go gathering Nuts in May'" over that of Michele Bachman who said, "We are running out of rich people in this country." She doesn't know her geography, history, science, sociology, demographics, and so how could anyone expect her to understand why gayness can't be prayed away. Pity that poor politician who thinks America is running out of millionaires. I'm lighting a candle for your birthday cake, close your eyes, and make a wish. Then let's go to the North Pole. We have too many nuts in May already!

Karren Alenier

read Kathi Wolfe's column

Poetry on Stage--No End of the World Opera

I love the trouble David Alpaugh is stirring up for the future of American poetry and how he frames this discussion with opera. I was pretty disturbed this past week when I started reading my copy of Poet & Writers magazine which is focused on MFA programs. And, yes, this is not a new subject about how too many people are being churned through these programs with degrees that for the most part are meaningless. Just for the record, the Steiny Road Poet does not have an MFA and has never seriously considered getting one. Supposedly these degrees are for people who want to teach or scale that rickety ladder of publishing success. This poet has done and led her share of poetry workshops on the inside and outside of universities to know they can be done anywhere and some have good value but at the end of a university program, what does the degree get -- a certified poet? What does this mean? However, what bothers me about Mr. Alpaugh's fine essay is what is missing. He has the older end of the poets' world covered but not the younger side which includes the controversial language poets led by such older poets as John Ashberry. Like the work of Gertrude Stein, too many people discount the work of language poets. Sure, there is a lot of so-called language poetry that is uninteresting, and this poet thinks that the MFA programs contribute to that, but just like any art form, the more you immerse yourself, the better you can judge the new stuff. So bring on the poetry theater -- there is no end of the world coming for poetry as long as we keep those sharp pencils moving.

Karren Alenier

read David Alpaugh's article

Don't Pick Fights with Poets Redux

As a poet attuned to the musical line, I want to say before the November issue of Scene4 hides the incredibly well thought out essay What Poets Can Learn from Songwriters by David Alpaugh that there are new ways to hear some of the poetic songwriters whose lyrics are surprising and get into your head when you least expect them to. For example, the Pandora app that brings tailored radio according to your favorite singer. I personally have tapped into Madeleine Peyroux radio which delivers to my ear Nellie McKay and other new songwriters as well as those from the past like Billie Holiday.

If you don't know the lyrics of Peyroux & McKay, see my review at
The Dressing titled Don't Pick Fights with Poets

Karren Alenier

Stein's Tea Party

No matter what convoluted political and cultural leanings and swayings, this is important information which is crucial to know. All sides. All angles.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's article

The Obscene Critic

Karren Alenier's article on the Washington Post's obscene review of Gertrude Stein and the exhibition Seeing Gertrude Stein: Five Stories at the National Portrait Gallery in D.C. brilliantly analyzes one particular case of openly declared "hatred" for Stein. This sort of hatred has followed Stein from the moment she began to publish, in the early twentieth century, but it is worth noting the context that gave rise to this "indecent exposure" in a serious newspaper like the Washington Post. Stein's present renaissance with two epochal traveling exhibitions has brought out people like critic Phil Kennicott who, as Alenier reminds us, assigns himself, a "seat in the corner with the Stein haters that include 'the worst sort of critics--anti-Semites, misogynists, homophobes and philistines.'" It is worth noticing that Stein's old enemies found new fodder and an academic seal of approval for their attacks in Barbara Will's book, Unlikely Collaboration: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ and the Vichy Dilemma (2011). The inflammatory book fed into the Stein controversy that was triggered by the exhibition Seeing Gertrude Stein: Five Stories at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, linked to the question how Stein and Toklas had managed to survive in Nazi-occupied France. Will's speculations about the "true Stein" and her alleged "collaboration" with a fascist friend and fascist regime unleashed a cultural hysteria, a sort of license to kill that took over the media and blogosphere. I have no doubt that this cultural atmosphere provided the justification for the Washington Post to publish the infamous article. Will camouflages the fact that her book is in fact about Bernard Faÿ, an intellectual friend of Steins's from the twenties, a once respected historian and author who during the war became a Gestapo informer and persecutor of the Freemasons in France. Hardly anybody today would care about Bernard Faÿ and his twisted fate as a condemned collaborator who was ultimately pardoned by French President Mitterand. Gertrude Stein is being used to create a story that pretends to be sensationalist news when the facts and allegations have already been published and rehashed numerous times, most recently by Janet Malcolm in Two Lives: Gertrude and Alice (2007).

Continue reading "The Obscene Critic" »

The Will to Find Steinian Truth

With all due respect to Renate Stendhal, who I cherish as a person Steinian, I find the work that Barbara Will published in Unlikely Collaboration: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ, and the Vichy Dilemma refreshing for its non sensationalization of a tough Stein scenario. 

I am on the record and urge you to read what I said in my recent Scene4 article An Invitation to Gertrude Stein's Tea Party.

As noted Stein scholar Catharine Stimpson said recently at a conference held partially at the National Portrait Gallery where the exhibition "Seeing Gertrude Stein" just closed, "Gertrude Stein was stupid about politics."

I consider Gertrude Stein, Renate Stendhal, and Barbara Will part of my Steinian family. I won't stop loving any of them.

Karren Alenier

Comments on Gertrude Stein Continued

Karren Alenier is a much cherished part of the Steinista tribe, indeed, and we agree quite happily to disagree. We all have a blind eye somewhere and Stein herself was the first to admit her political stupidity and inexperience: "Writers are not really interested in politics..." etc. To be on the record, this was the point of my detailed article in the Los Angles Review of Books, Was Gertrude Stein A Collaborator? (In a shorter version - Exclusive: Was Gertrude Stein A Hitler Fan?

An academic like Catharine R. Stimpson has begun to see Will's book with different eyes, as I was privileged to hear from herself. Others, like the great Stein expert Marjorie Perloff, have never been taken in. If you want a non-sensationalist account of Stein's war years, I refer you to the book by Dominique Saint Pierre, "Gertrude Stein, le Bugey, la guerre" -- an impeccable study by an historian, devoid of the inflated speculations in Barbara Will's book.

Renate Stendhal

Steiny Road Poet - On the Road

What a noisy and exciting eight-ring circus your time in Chicago must have been! Delightful write-up.

Elisavietta Ritchie

read Karren Alenier's column

The Man Who Came to Dinner

I believe Christopher Blake's advice to young people, should apply to the Steiny Poet, as well. Read the play, and review it. It can't hurt a 91 year old, underappreciated American playwright to have his work critiqued, especially on the Internet. Best of luck, Citizen Blake!

Robert Wrynn

read the Steiny Poet's column

Christopher Blake/Gertrude Stein

Dear Karren Alenier, it was a pleasure to read your interview with Christopher Blake. I've known Chris for 25 years, he is such an original. He has written a great deal over the years and is an amazing story teller. It's true that Chris had an eye for the extravagant. It is his way. He cooks, entertains, and lives life through the prism of a romantic.  He is truly one of a kind.

Mark Vancour

read Karren Alenier's column

Christopher Blake/Gertrude Stein

Wonderful to bring living history into the present like this.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's column

Article About Christopher Blake

Thanks for the cogent article on Christopher Blake. Very well done. I am in the process of getting ready to mount a reading of Mr. Blake's "5 Rue Christine" with a full production scheduled for a later date. I am also writing a play about Ms. Stein called "Willing Shadows". Both plays will be read October 5 & 6th. Barbara Will, author of "Unlikely Collaboration", put me in touch with Mr. Blake and he has been an invaluable resource. Your interview with him also helps me a great deal, thank you!

Michael H. Arve

read Karren Alenier's column

Christopher Blake

History unfolding HERE and NOW!

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's column

Stein Thriving

Karren Alenier's review of ModPo is great and important support for important work. What an opportunity to immerse oneself, to learn and grow. I love the photo of Gertrude. She made a beautiful Gibson Girl.

Mary Scott

read Karren Alenier's column

The Muse

What a marvelous woman she was, Marie Laurencin. She began 100 years ago what is in full flower today. Karren LaLonde Alenier's exploratory of her is excellent and lovingly written.

Phyllis Mazik

read Karren Lalonde Alenier's column - The Steiny Road to Operadom

Stein's 'America'

Nice analysis. I wonder how she would have treated WWII and Vietnam and 9/11? I wonder if she were alive today, where she would live? I don't think in the U.S.

Phyllis Mazik

read Karren LaLonde Alenier's column

Gertrude Stein Poem

Wonderful explication. Should be in the back of every Stein book for the classroom.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren LaLonde Alenier's column

Marie Laurencin

Wonderful follow-up to your earlier profile of Laurencin and friends. Her beautiful portrait is an image for the times, then and now. Who is like her today I wonder.

Phyllis Mazik

read Karren LaLonde Alenier's column

Ars Poetica

Though I'm not a fan of metre-less free verse, Alenier draws a telling parallel between Stein and Bashaw. Worthy of operatic treatment? I don't think so. Bashaw's language is rather unlyrical but so is a lot of libretto being written today. Thanks for the insight into her work.

Louis Laird

read Karren LaLonde Alenier's column

Molly Bashaw

I cannot agree with the prior comment respective to Molly Bashaw's verse. I find her verse quite lyrical, quite musical. I don't know about its application to opera, still it works with my sensibility and ears.

A. S. Waterson

read Karren LaLonde Alenier's column

Racism Is Thoughtless

Karren LaLonde Alenier writes an excellent review of the film "Hannah Arendt" and closes it with a rather stirring statement at the end. Though Alenier highlights in her comparison of Arendt and Gertrude Stein that both of them were, in one sense, dismissive of anti-semitism she isn't clear about the fact that antisemitism is racism and "racism is thoughtless." It's a poison in the blood and a disease of the bones. If this weren't true then how can we account for the color-driven (especially black and red) hatred in the United States, where someone just looks at a skin color or the shape of a face and is driven to say and do evil things. It's more than that. Racism is part of a heritage. The Nazis weren't alone, they were surrounded by millions of complicit Germans who felt and exhibited what had been part of Germanic culture for centuries and for that matter the rest of Europe as well. Eichmann may have been a banal bureaucrat, but he was also a "pure" German, a "pure" racist and his racism required no thinking.

Kurt Trautmann

read Karren LaLonde Alenier's review

Rather, Midnight of the Gods

The MFA-ridden pobiz scene will eventually collapse under its own weight. I wouldn't be surprized if MFA-wielding poets already out-number their audience. What can be done to help bleed this monster white? I'd like to suggest a network of poet cooperatives made up of independents and presses willing to publish them. Otherwise, prepare for the Twilight of the Gods to usher in a new Dark Age where pale monks scribble for no one but each other. Excuse me if I seem to be predicting the present?

Charles Behlen

read Karren LaLonde Alenier's column

Marfield

Thank you Karren for breathing life into an important literary occasion in American Letters which may have gone unnoticed and certainly benefited from your verve and passion for the arts.

Grace Cavalieri

read Karren Alenier's article

On this Stein, you have built

Karren, Once again you have done your excellent poet's synthesis of Stein facts and Stein words! Another just tribute in this centenary year of TENDER BUTTONS.

Hans Gallas

read Karren Alenier's article

Gertrude Stein, right-wing intellectual...

Artist and precursor to the Heideggerian, post modern fascination for identity politics, she hated FDR's 'New Deal' and praised Marshall Petain's  Vichy government. Pound was of her ilk, politics and talent. Perhaps, this is what is meant by the title:  "Gertrude Stein and Moral Rightness".

Mike Ballard

read Karren Alenier's article

Sometimes Moral Rightness Can Kill You

I appreciate Mike Ballard's factual framing (Stein hated FDR's 'New Deal' and praised Marshall Petain's  Vichy government) around the provocative title "Gertrude Stein and Moral Rightness."

As to Pound and Stein being of the same ilk--yes they were both Modernist poets and geniuses with right-wing views and you could say both were cock sure of themselves like willful children. However, Stein was a Jew living in Nazi occupied France trying to survive. Initially the French people supported Petain because he was a World War I hero. Stein participated in WWI and was given a medal for her service. By the end of WWII, Stein and her right-winged neighbors no longer supported Petain and they were all participating in the resistance.

Pound, an anti-Semite exercising his American right to free speech, had a radio show in Italy where he lived all during the war. He promoted the authoritarian regime of Mussolini and was paid for these broadcasts by the Italian Ministry of Popular Culture. People who knew Pound said the payment didn't matter to him, he would have said the same thing without the money. 

Let's put it this way, sometimes moral rightness can get you killed. In wartime, people tend to bend the rules. Did Pound's behavior look like a survival tactic?  And Stein, bending the rules was always an agenda with her. I believe she was politically naïve. A lot of geniuses, including Stein and Pound, have done things that do not sit well with ordinary folks.

Karren Alenier

read Karren Alenier's article

Jenner and Stein

What a powerful, insightful, educational analysis Alenier writes for us.

Grace Cavalieri

Karren Alenier's column: "The Genderqueerness of Bruce Jenner and Gertrude Stein"

Stein, Jenner and Vanity Fair

Now that Caitlyn Jenner has debuted on the cover of Vanity Fair magazine, there is yet another link to Stein who was featured in the magazine off and on for almost 30 years!

Hans Gallas

Karren Alenier's column: "The Genderqueerness of Bruce Jenner and Gertrude Stein"

Link 'Tween Stein Jenner Vanity Fair

Thanks Hans Gallas for making that connection between two gender puzzling icons and the magazine Vanity Fair. Both people really want/ed the 'gloire' of being recognized. This really puts a lot of weight on the word 'Vanity'!

Karren Alenier

See prior letter

Caitlyn Jenner

You and Vanity Fair are publically taking part in the denigration of dignity in the human species and natural order. The Caitlin story glamourizing a very troubled being, will seed the way for more gender confusion in our youth, and has minimized what it is to really be a woman. It takes a lifetime to become a beautiful woman, not just a surgeon, some satin and a stylist. The irresponsible propagation of sexual confusion, needs to stop. Thank you.

DD

Karren Alenier's column: "The Genderqueerness of Bruce Jenner & Gertrude Stein"

The N-Word

It is always good to hear Karren Alenier's intelligent elucidating
comments on any subject. The racism Stein/Trump piece is especially thoughtful.

Grace Cavalieri

Karren Alenier's column: The N-Word: Trump Versus Stein

The N-Word

I found this article absolutely fascinating! Thank you for writing it.

Kelly Cherry

Karren Alenier's column: The N-Word: Trump Versus Stein

A Stein Acolyte Delivers a Cautionary Tale

This article is a masterful blend of deep knowledge of Gertrude Stein's work, a deeply-considered book review (Scene4 June 2016), and a fascinating author interview which is the result of savvy questions.  Alenier asks the questions we want to know the answers to, and also the questions we should have wanted to know the answers to.  There's so much here to ponder and continue pondering.  Out-of-the-box work, thanks!

Teri Rife

Karren LaLonde Alenier's column: "Stein Acolyte Delivers A Cautionary Tale "

A New Opera on Stein's First Love Affair

This article has much to recommend it: a young composer to follow, news of a chamber opera on Stein which can be viewed on YouTube, mention of an Aaron Copland song cycle set on Dickinson poems, which was unknown to me. Catnip for lover of Stein, opera, song and poetry!

Teri Rife

Karren LaLonde Alenier's column: A New Opera on Stein's First Love Affair

Red Emma

Thank you for reviewing this play. In your concise writing, you bear down heavily and rightly so on the infuriating parallels between Emma Goldman's time and our Trump-time today. I hope this production will be available soon and also published. There are so many people who need to be awakened before November.

Emily Osterman

Karren Alenier's column: Red Emma

Quotes from Gertrude Stein

Let sanity prevail! A thumbs-up from Dallas for Karren Alenier's perspicacious article.

Teri Rife

Karren Alenier's column: Quotes From Gertrude Stein In This Election Season

Gertrude and the Critics

Dear Ms Alenier, you are a blessed avatar for dear Gertrude. She would love you for all the attention and scholariness you pay to her. Keep it going, please.

Marcus Goldberg

Karren Alenier's column: Critics

Throwing Tomatoes

Delightful story from "down on the farm." What's changed today is that poets and other public presenters have now armed themselves with more rotten tomatoes than their audience and even more unmentionables including their poetry.

Eve Sundal

Karren Alenier's column: "Delivering a Successful Poetry Reading"

Poor Sylvia

Ms Alenier offers a pleasant review of what is apparently another insightful exhibit of the life and times and perceptions of the woe-begone Sylvia Plath. More insights, more commentary, more banderole. She was an interesting writer and led what some think was an interesting life before she ended it. Deeper into the dust the literary archaeologists go, long after the mummy has been removed, searching for another trinket. Sylvia be damned; she had no idea this was going to happen but she would have enjoyed it. Perhaps.


Malcolm Prinz

Karren Alenier's column: Sylvia Plath

About Alenier

This page contains an archive of all entries posted to RECENT LETTERS in the Alenier category. They are listed from oldest to newest.

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